More than 500 Academic Experts on Asian American Studies, Race, and Access to Education Submit Amicus Brief Supporting Race-Conscious College Admissions

More than 500 scholars (list below) holding doctorates in a wide range of academic fields, including education, Asian American studies, political science, economics, sociology, anthropology and psychology, have submitted an amicus curiae (friend-of-the-court) brief in support of Harvard University, in a case currently being considered by the U.S. District Court in Massachusetts.

The lawsuit was filed by Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA), an organization created by Edward Blum, who recruited Asian American plaintiffs in the case after he lost the last major challenge against affirmative action before the U.S. Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas (2016). In the case, SFFA argues that Harvard’s limited consideration of race in its admissions process intentionally discriminates against Asian American applicants. The amicus brief supports the use of race-conscious whole-person review. The brief was filed today.

The brief, submitted by scholars with expertise on Asian American studies, race, and college access, draws upon amici’s original research and the most extensive and up-to-date body of knowledge relevant to the legal issues in the case. The brief addresses: (1) why Asian American applicants, like applicants of all races, benefit from Harvard’s whole-person review process; and (2) why SFFA’s arguments are based on racial myths and stereotypes of Asian Americans.

AMICUS CURIAE BRIEF OF 531 SOCIAL SCIENTISTS AND SCHOLARS ON COLLEGE ACCESS, ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES, AND RACE IN SUPPORT OF DEFENDANT

Continue reading “More than 500 Academic Experts on Asian American Studies, Race, and Access to Education Submit Amicus Brief Supporting Race-Conscious College Admissions”

Asian American Percentage of Harvard Applicants Admits & Matriculants

The graph shows the Asian American percetange of Harvard applicants (red) out of the total applicant pool, the percentage of Asian American admitted students (green), and the Asian American percentage of matriculants, or people who were admitted and taking classes towards a major (purple) from 1980-2018.

The yellow dotted line is the percetange of Asian American percantage of US undergraduate enrollment.

Uncovering the Truth – National Webinar Details

Uncovering the Truth

Thursday, September 20, 2018

@ 8 PM EST / 5 PM PST

Learn from experts in higher education and college admissions of affirmative action and holistic review of Asian Americans from experts in the field and practitioners from schools. Webinar will be on

RSVP by  Monday, September 17 – http://bit.ly/UncoveringTheTruthWebinar

Technical Information to join the webinar will be sent prior to 9/20!

Dr. Julie J. Park – Julie J. Park is associate professor of education at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her research addresses how race, religion, and social class affect diversity and equity in higher education, including the diverse experiences of Asian American college students. She is the author of When Diversity Drops: Race, Religion, and Affirmative Action in Higher Education (Rutgers University Press, 2013) and the upcoming book Race on Campus: Debunking Myths with Data (Harvard Education Press, forthcoming).

Alyson Tom – Alyson Tom has worked in education for fifteen years. She is Associate Director of College Counseling at Castilleja School in California, where she advises students on college admissions and financial aid. She serves on the NACAC Government Relations Committee and is the incoming Co-Chair of the NACAC Asian Pacific Islander Special Interest Group. Before Castilleja, she worked as a College Counselor at Episcopal High School and Assistant Director and Senior Assistant Director of Admission at Rice University in Texas. Alyson holds a B.A. from Rice University and an M.Ed. in Higher Education Administration from the University of Houston.

Rebecca – A high school senior in the San Francisco Bay Area, Rebecca is passionate about diversity and inclusion. After attending the NAIS Student Diversity Leadership Conference, she was inspired to lead an Asian-American Affinity Group at her school because she wanted to create a space for students to embrace their heritage and to discuss issues they face. Rebecca is currently helping to plan a Diversity and Inclusion in Education Conference for teachers and students which will take place later this fall. When she’s not in class or writing college essays, Rebecca enjoys volleyball, reading, and trying new food with friends.

Moderator – Dr. OiYan Poon – Dr. OiYan Poon is an Assistant Professor of higher education leadership in the School of Education and Director of the Center for Racial Justice in Education and Research. Her research focuses on the racial politics and discourses of college access, higher education organization and policy, affirmative action, and Asian Americans.

 

Moderator – Douglas H. Lee – Douglas H. Lee is a graduate research assistant in the Higher Education Leadership program at Colorado State University where he is a current Ph.D. student. He has previously served as the Associate Director at the University of Utah Asia Campus in South Korea, Assistant Director of the Asian American Center at Northeastern University in Boston, and Senior Program Manager at OCA in Washington D.C.

Panelists subject to change and webinar is limited to 500 people

35 Asian American groups and higher education faculty file amicus brief in support of race-conscious admissions at Harvard

The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) and 34 Asian American groups and higher education faculty today filed an amicus “friend of the court” brief in Massachusetts federal court, opposing a challenge to Harvard’s race-conscious admissions policy (Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA) v. Harvard).

“Asian Americans are an extremely diverse population with more than 50 ethnic groups, 100 languages, and a broad range of immigration, socioeconomic, and educational backgrounds,” said Margaret Fung, AALDEF executive director. “Instead of treating Asian Americans as a monolithic group, the individualized race-conscious admissions process at Harvard helps to create a more diverse student body that benefits all students, including Asian Americans.”

The plaintiff organization SFFA was created by Edward Blum, who has a long history of opposing affirmative action and restricting voting rights. In 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court rejected his claims in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin and reaffirmed that race may be considered as one of several factors in the college admissions process. Blum has continued his crusade against affirmative action by recruiting Asian American students to assert that Harvard discriminated against them.

In their brief, AALDEF and other Amici contend that by improperly grouping the diverse pool of Asian American applicants into a single “Asian” category, SFFA actually perpetuates the “model minority” myth and fails to disclose that its requested remedy–the elimination of race-conscious admissions–would mostly benefit white applicants, not Asian Americans.  The Amici reiterated their opposition to caps, quotas, or any negative action against Asian Americans but asserted that SFFA improperly conflates negative action with a race-conscious admissions policy that recognizes the importance of diversity.

Ken Kimerling, AALDEF legal director and one of the attorneys for Amici, said: “This case is hotly contested by witnesses and experts on both sides. However, SFFA has not submitted facts to support a finding of intentional discrimination against Asian Americans.” He noted that SFFA has not presented any supporting statements by the 40 or more persons involved each year to review and analyze the applications for admission. Kimerling said: “If there were a policy, written or unstated, to discriminate against Asian Americans, one or more of the 40 persons would have spoken up about it in the past decade. Clearly, the plaintiff’s motion for summary judgment must be denied.”

Foley Hoag LLP is pro bono co-counsel representing the Amici.

In addition to AALDEF, 34 Asian American groups and higher education faculty are Co-Amici:

18 Million Rising
Asian American Federation
Asian American Psychological Association
Asian Americans United
Asian Law Alliance
Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance
Asian Pacific American Network
Asian Pacific American Women Lawyers Alliance
Asian Pacific Islander Americans for Civic Empowerment
Chinese for Affirmative Action
Chinese Progressive Association
Coalition for Asian American Children & Families
GAPIMNY
Japanese American Citizens League
Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics
National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community Development
National Korean American Service & Education Consortium
National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance
OCA – Asian Pacific American Advocates
Southeast Asia Resource Action Center

Individuals
(Institutional affiliations provided for identification purposes only)

Vichet Chhuon – U. of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Gabriel J. Chin – University of California, David School of Law
Tarry Hum, MCP, PhD – Queens College CUNY
Anil Kalhan – Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law
Nancy Leong – University of Denver Sturm College of Law
Shirley Lung – City University of New York School of Law
Mari J. Matsuda – William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai’i at Manoa
Kevin Nadal, PhD – City University of New York
Philip Tajitsu Nash – University of Maryland at College Park
Cathy J. Schlund-Vials – University of Connecticut
Sona Shah – University of Texas at Austin
John Kuo Wei Tchen – Rutgers University-Newark
Margaret Y.K. Woo – Northeastern University School of Law
K. Wayne Yang – University of California, San Diego

You can download the amicus brief here: http://bit.ly/2C1YIkd.