Minh-Ha T. Pham: ‘De Blasio’s Plan for NYC Schools Isn’t Anti-Asian, It’s Anti-Racist’

Minh-Ha T. Pham, an associate professor at Pratt Institute, writes in a June 13, 2018, opinion piece in The New York Times about New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to change the way students will be chosen for eight of the city’s elite specialized high schools.

Unfortunately, some Asian-American parents in New York are protesting this proposal, arguing that it is anti-Asian because it would decrease the number of Asian children in elite schools. They are on the wrong side of this educational fight.

The mayor’s plan isn’t anti-Asian, it’s anti-racist. It would give working-class parents — including Asian-Americans — who can’t afford and shouldn’t have to find ways to afford expensive test prep programs a fairer chance that their child will be admitted into what’s known as a specialized high school.

Read the opinion piece.

Re-Imagining Leadership Summit Offers Leadership Training for Young Chinese Americans

The Re-Imagining Leadership Summit (http://www.reimaginingleadership.org) is a five-day program that provides an opportunity for Chinese American young people in the metropolitan Boston area to develop critical consciousness for leadership. The Summit runs August 6-10, 2018, at Harvard University’s Phillips Brooks House.

The Summit will give selected participants an opportunity to explore the local history and contemporary experiences of Chinese Americans in relation to other communities, and to connect with other members of the Asian American community in Boston.

Program participants will:

  • Reflect on personal and family histories.
  • Developing a community of learning and support in the Boston area.
  • Collectively cultivate an analysis of intersecting social systems that shape diverse Chinese American communities, histories, experiences, and cultures.

Participants will be recognized in a May reception where they will be gifted, and invited to read, the following books:

  • Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People — by Helen Zia
  • American Born Chinese — by Gene Luen Yang
  • Living for Change: An Autobiography — by Grace Lee Boggs
  • The Good Immigrants: How the Yellow Peril became the Model Minority — by Madeline Hsu

Participants will also be invited to complete a creative culminating project by the end of the program.

The Re-Imagining Leadership Summit is organized by Chinese Americans Re-Imagining Leadership is a collective of Chinese Americans from the Boston metropolitan region working to develop a new generation of Chinese Americans committed to transformative community leadership for social justice: Eugenia Beh, Delia Cheung Hom, Felix Poon, OiYan Poon, Ellen Wang, and Chu Huang.

Learn more at http://www.reimaginingleadership.org.

Best Reads About Affirmative Action – December 2017

Below are great reads about affirmative action.

You’re not going to get accepted into a top university on merit aloneThe Conversation.

“…We should discard the notion that admissions is a meritocratic process that selects the “best” 18-year-olds who apply to a selective university. When we let go of our meritocracy ideals, we see more clearly that so many talented, accomplished young people who will be outstanding leaders in the future will not make it to the likes of Harvard, Stanford and Yale.”

Harvard student’s story offers window on ‘diversity’ in the US college admissions. Asia Times.

“Vietnamese and Filipinos in the US, according to Thang, typically face higher educational hurdles than Chinese and other Asian groups due to the scars left on their cultures by Western colonialism…”

The Price of AdmissionSlate.

“I believe affirmative action is a necessary policy to counter systemic racism and provide students with a diverse set of peers. But after seeing Asians take center stage in the debate in the months since I’ve graduated, I can’t stop thinking about the disquieting incentives that the college application process is creating for Asian students in America, as it once did for me.”